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The untold truth of fruity pebbles

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The untold truth of fruity pebbles

Though it seems Fruity Pebbles has been around since the beginning of time (maybe it's the prehistoric Flintstone family's use as their lifelong pets?) They're relatively new to the grocery store breakfast cereal rack across the country, and they only entered the US market in 1970 (through Post cereals) Other cereals that are still on the shelves and in the pantries, such as Ice cream flakes Y Crispy gold They date back to the 1950s.

Fruity Pebbles appeared on the scene at the same time as its chocolate-flavored counterpart, Cocoa Pebbles, but it seems that every cereal consumer has a strong belief about which of the two cereals is superior. A bowl filled with the fruit variety looks like a beautiful tub of sugary confetti, and there's something about the cereal's small size that makes it easy to move from bowl to bowl of this breakfast classic.

The ever-changing fruity pebbles

Some cereals never change, and they manage to maintain their same formula since they were born. This is not the case with Fruity Pebbles, whose recipe and appearance have changed and retouched over time.

At first, there were only three colors in each frame: yellow, red, and orange (via Pop story) You can even say that the cereal didn't always look so vibrant looking at the old cereal boxes, which feature only a handful of colors in the bowls on display.

In 1980, purple was added and green stones were included starting in 1984. In the 2000s, the formula for Fruity Pebbles also included a fiber additive called polydextrose, which stirred some feathers as it is considered a fake fiber and " functional "compared to natural dietary fiber (through Blackboard) Unconfirmed reports say this ingredient has been removed from the cereal as of 2012, but it's best to check the ingredient list yourself to make sure.

The Untold Story of the Fruity Pebbles Pet Family

The Flintstones are no longer on the minds of American viewers in the same way as they were in the 1960s, but even someone with very little knowledge of cartoon history probably knows that Fred and Wilma's daughter was named Pebbles . This also occurred to Post Cereal executives, who thought that using the Flintstones to advertise a cereal named after their daughter would be a brilliant commercial move (via Mr breakfast)

The timing wouldn't have been better for the cartoon franchise either, as the series was canceled in 1966. Less than five years later, as a group of cereal executives decided to unite these two unlikely products, the Flintstones had a new concert. walking sugary breakfast cereal. Even though Fred Flintstone may not be as well known as before, he has graced the boxes of Fruity Pebbles for over 50 years.

Legal problems for post cereal

WWE wrestler Hulk Hogan filed a lawsuit against cereal producer Post when a commercial for Fruity Pebbles' sister cereal, Cocoa Pebbles, aired, showing Fred Flintstone and his friend Barney in a wrestling match against a wrestler named Hulk Boulder (via The St. Petersburg Times) At the end of the commercial, Fred & # 39; s Daughter Bamm-Bamm crushes Hulk Boulder and the famous (real-life) fighter thought the commercial had damaged his image.

Although some might scoff and say that Hogan was not being reasonable and was doing something out of nothing, a closer look at the case reveals that he may have been right. According to his autobiography, early in his career, Hogan used the Hulk Boulder name before deciding that he wanted to change it to look more Irish. The lawsuit was settled at the end of that year and the cereal company agreed not to broadcast the commercial any longer.



https://www.mashed.com/200430/the-untold-truth-of-fruity-pebbles/

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